Hoosier Morning

36 comments by   |   Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 10:17 am EDT

1. HOOSIERS HQ
Indiana remained No. 1 in the AP poll, but coach Tom Crean says getting better is what matters, Dustin wrote.

Winning at Ohio State Sunday stands as the signature road victory of the Tom Crean era, I wrote.

Former IU basketball player Bobby Masters died on Friday, we reported.

Oklahoma assistant coach James Patton is eager to fill the void of Mark Hagen’s departure under former colleague Kevin Wilson, Dustin wrote.

2. IT’S INDIANA
Barcelona is soccer’s equivalent of Indiana and some advice for Gus Johnson, from Matthew Futterman of the Wall Street Journal.

North Central freshman Eron Gordon, younger brother of former Hoosier Eric Gordon, might have actually exceeded expectations this year, Kyle Neddenriep of the Indianapolis Star writes.

Tom Crean understands what Nebraska coach Tim Miles is going through, Lee Barfknecht of the Omaha World-Herald writes.

The fact Indiana is No. 1 in one poll and Duke in another, with first-place votes scattered in the wind, is a positive for college basketball, Eamonn Brennan of ESPN.com writes.

3. COMMENTARY
One man’s meaningless game is another man’s treasure, and college basketball is definitely a treasure, Eric Crawford of WDRB.com writes.

4. ONE FOR THE ROAD
“One” by Three Dog Night.

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36 comments:
#1
Hoosier Clarion
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 10:44 AM EDT

Chet, what do you think of the IOC booting wrestling starting 2020? I don’t get it.

 
#2
Chet
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 11:23 AM EDT

It’s crazy. What’s next? Track and field?

A couple years ago the University of Nebraska-Omaha hired Trev Albert from ESPN as their AD. Their wrestling program was the defending DII champion. Not only were they not costing the university, they had made a $200,000 profit the previous year.

Albert dropped the program, costing the university $200,000/year. They had several returning All Americans.

I can’t think of any rationale. It’s a world wide sport. Even countries without soccer teams have wrestling. It’s a cheap sport to operate.

The school my son wrestled for has since dropped the sport when they hired a new AD. They were the defending conference champs. The AD said she wanted to focus assets on basketball. It must have worked. They were 6-27 last year.

But the Olympics? There is as much history attached to Olympic wrestling as any sport out there. It makes no sense.

 
#3 Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 11:31 AM EDT

Olympic style wrestling is antiquated. Between the lack of popularity and the overindulgence of PEDs in the sport, it was a good move by the IOC.

MMA is the present and future.

 
#4
Hoosier Clarion
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 11:57 AM EDT

Hilarious! Please explain to me there are no PED’s past, present or future in MMA.

I agree with Chet, wrestling is economical to administer. Also in an environment such as the B1G can be a good spectator sport. I’ll make this 1 low pay grade prediction. Between now and 2016 wrestling will be reinstated as an Olympic sport going forward, an IOC 180. After all how in the hell does the IOC not understand the history of the name Greco-Roman.

 
#5
Chet
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 11:59 AM EDT

Actually, the nature of wrestling makes PED use extremely unlikely with the possible exception of super heavyweight. Probably more so than any other sport. Not many PEDs are associated with keeping body mass as low as possible.

You must be thinking of the ballroom dancing of WWE. I’m sure those folks are a regular stew of the stuff. But that has nothing to do with wrestling. It’s more akin the Dancing With The Stars than sport.

As far as popularity, it’s regional. A soccer game at Iowa might draw 100 people, a wrestling match will (and always does) outsell the basketball team.

 
#6
Yesterday's Gone
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 12:00 PM EDT

Dustin – Jeremy. See in the HT that IU is opening a “gateway” office in New Delhi, India.

Scoop participants ( well, me) wonder how that will impact recruitment in the future. Have either of you suggested a on-site analysis? Or are you waiting for an IU office at South Beach (when they say you can see anything on South Beach – they are not kidding).

 
#7
iuhoosier1992
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 12:04 PM EDT

Also remember that Title 9 has forced some wrestling programs to go away as well due to the fact that there isn’t a female equivalent sport.

 
#8
Chet
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 12:09 PM EDT

At any rate, if your argument were to hold water that would mean the IOC would have added MMA when they dropped wrestling. I’m not aware of that happening. MMA is more of a competitor to boxing than wrestling anyway.

I’m betting HC is correct. I’d wager that wrestling is returned to the lineup before 2016. Regardless of regional preferences, it’s far more popular as a spectator sport than mountain biking (which I am heavily into, BTW), etc.

 
#9
Chet
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 12:11 PM EDT

iuhoosier1992, you are right on target. Title IX has proven to be the death knell of collegiate wrestling.

 
#10 Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 12:14 PM EDT

Dustin & Jeremy – can you please weigh-in (no pun intended) on wrestling being removed from the olympics from a journalist’s point of view? Wouldn’t you rather write obits than cover olympic style wrestling?

 
#11
Chet
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 12:52 PM EDT

Aruss, just out of curiosity and not that it matters, but do you know the difference between Olympic wrestling and collegiate?

 
#12
iuhoosier1992
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 1:09 PM EDT

Chet, I agree. There are two type of wrestling that occurs in the Olympics, freestyle(collegiate style wrestling) and Greco Roman. These are two totally different styles and points systems. Most wrestlers will concentrate on just one and not both. It is pretty rare to see someone competing in both.

 
#13 Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 1:26 PM EDT

If you still want to know, Aruss, I’m definitely on board with Chet on this one. I covered wrestling my freshman year at Penn State. Even in Pennsylvania, where to some people, wrestling is a religion, I was never into it growing up and certainly never wrestled myself, but I gained a lot of respect for that sport when I was covering it. It takes an incredible athlete to not only do what they do, but do it while making weight. (I always considered that part of it scary and I’m glad high schools especially have made a point to regulate that better, but I digress). I saw Cael Sanderson break Dan Gable’s record for consecutive wins, and he remains one of the most amazing athletic marvels I’ve ever covered. Also, wrestling is one of the pillar sports of the Olympics that truly goes back to the Greeks and Romans, and not only that, it’s also the only fighting sport left that is not essentially bloodsport that one can watch without feeling legitimately guilty about what’s happening to the combatants.
I haven’t read anything on this yet. What earthly reason is the IOC giving for this move?

 
#14
terraplane blues
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 1:47 PM EDT

Where is Harvard to decry the wrestling conversation taking place? It’s a shame that so many “impure” Hoosier souls such as Chet, Dustin, iuhoosier1992 and Aruss would discuss such matters in the middle of a basketball resurgence.

 
#15
Chet
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 1:50 PM EDT

Aruss, I get it. I feel the same way about soccer.

iuhoosier1992, while Freestyle is much closer to collegiate than is Greco-Roman it is still quite different. As an example, you get points for ‘turning’ and opponent. For lack of a better description, thinking of it as forcing them to roll over. Takedowns are of great value and there are different types. In fact you can “Five a guy” scoring a takedown where the opposing wrestler is launched and turned above head level. My son once “fived” a future Hoosier great at the Central US Championships. Both GR and Freestyle are much more focused on points and, in most cases you only go to 5 and you must win two out of three matches. In collegiate scores may well be into the teens and a major win is by 10 points and it is a single match.

Anyway, my point being, all three are very different with Greco Roman being the most unusual. My son won six state championship in GR and Freestyle. He got to train at the US Olympic Center with Terry Brands (wrestling insiders will know him) at Colorado Springs but never qualified for the Olympics. When his maternal grandmother (a big sports fan)was diagnosed with terminal cancer she said she was most sad that she wouldn’t see him in the Olympics.

It wasn’t to be.

It was an important sport to us and a big part of our lives for many years.

 
#16
Harvard for Hillbillies
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 1:56 PM EDT

Keep ping pong, kayaking, badminton, married couples doubles tennis, roller skating, speed cycling in a bowl slightly larger than a Shaquille O’Neal custom made commode, synchronized paddle butt scratching(an ancient English sport of kings performed on rainy weekends when the ground was too soggy to play cricket), trampoline(not to be confused with an Kelly Clarkson diet)…..but drop wrestling?

One can only surmise it was budgetary reasons..Evidenced by the list above enumerating only the purest of sports since the first days of Athens remaining in the games.

 
#17 Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 2:07 PM EDT

Aruss,
From strictly a journalists’ point of view, I would rather cover wrestling than write obits, but it’s close. However, removing wrestling from the Olympics is not a good thing. It’s the one man-to-man sport that is a test of a mental and physical toughness, with no props needed. And it has over the years correlated to so many other sports in developing footwork and coordination. Taking away what little spotlight wrestling had via the Olympics means even fewer kids in the future will find any reason to take interest.

 
#18
Harvard for Hillbillies
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 2:10 PM EDT

oops. …..[a] Kelly Clarkson diet.

Did I mention tetherball in 2020?

And get the NBA players out of the Olympics…Rich SOB’s don’t need to flaunt their grotesque money next to the flag. Makes me puke…Give the damn opportunity to a 20-year-old wrestler that will only have one chance his life to see the world and play for the pride his country.

NBA playesr have no pride in anything except the size a mirror in their 200O sq.ft. bathroom at their 3rd home in South Beach.

 
#19
Harvard for Hillbillies
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 2:34 PM EDT

Have that be a lesson to you, terraplane blues.

See how you bring it back to the Establishment and basketball? Should transition right back into Hoosier basketball(a team that still embodies the collective spirit and pride in a game rather than the sole individualistic pursuits that have muddied it up in recent decades).
The Olympics? It’s all about money..Establishment money boosting their Establishment rankings. The Olympics no longer have anything to do with playing for country and exhibiting global attempts at peace and sportsmanship through individual and team competition. It’s about putting the rich on display. Rich tennis players..rich golfers…rich NBA players. I could really care less to watch much of it anymore. Even the Winter Games have turned into another marketing toy and making celebrity where they choose to concentrate coverage and manipulate the teenage viewers…Gone is the extensive coverage many the old ‘cool’ sports(ski jumping). We have to watch a basically a modified XGames and that redheaded
American dweeb take his act and his marketing machine courtesy the Establishment into hours and hours coverage of snowboarding tricks. It’s all about marketing the sports that can influence the dollar spending at home. Where’s the money, video game, product endorsements, cereal box photo shoots, etc, etc. in making celebrities out of skinny wrestlers?

 
#20
Hoosier Clarion
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 3:13 PM EDT

Wrestlers can make good FB players as they are not afraid of the 1 on 1 mentality, they understand footwork and leverage intensely.

 
#21
Ron
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 3:51 PM EDT

I can add nothing to this tread. Never got past Daytona Bike Week’s Mud and Jello wrestling. Which does have a draw of some kind.

Badminton did have somewhat of a scandal last Oympics I believe. Teams purposely lose a game or two?

Introduced badminton to granddaughter last summer. Younger granddaughter came out to watch. Explained the game to her, she watched for awhile. Asked if we got better would the game than be goodminton. That never happened.

 
#22
Chet
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 4:00 PM EDT

HC, Curly Culp, who was up for the HOF recently, never played college football. He went from the mat to the NFL.

 
#23
Not so fast my friend
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 4:27 PM EDT

Feb. 2, 2013

OFFICIAL PRO FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME RELEASE

TEMPE – Curley Culp, a two-sport standout during his time at Arizona State University and member of the Arizona State Hall of Fame, will be enshrined as part of the 2013 Hall of Fame Class, the Pro Football Hall of Fame Selection Committee announced today.

Culp will join the legends in Canton as part of the seven-member HOF class selected today in New Orleans, La., earning one of the two senior selections that are available in each voting class. The newest members of the Hall of Fame were selected from a list of 17 finalists who had been determined earlier by the Pro Football Hall of Fame’s Selection Committee.

A two-sport star for the Sun Devils from 1965 to 1967, Curley Culp was an All-American defensive lineman in 1967, as selected by Sporting News and Time.

In 1967, he won the NCAA national championship as a heavyweight wrestler – becoming the first Sun Devil to earn an NCAA title in the sport. He was the Gorriarian Award recipient for the most pins at that competition and was later named to the 1968 Olympic squad.

The Yuma, Ariz., native was twice named to the All-Western Athletic Conference team while in Tempe before beginning his professional career with the Kansas City Chiefs of the AFL in 1968. He starred for the Chiefs, appearing in the 1969 AFL All-Star Game and the 1971 Pro Bowl.

He played in 179 games during 14 seasons of professional football, representing the Chiefs from 1968-74. He is the 10th member of the Kansas City Chiefs to be elected to the Hall of Fame and was also inducted to the Chiefs’ Hall of Fame in 2008.

Culp started at defensive tackle on Kansas City’s Super Bowl IV squad, helping the Chiefs earn a 23-7 victory over the Minnesota Vikings and is now the fifth member of that Super Bowl team to be enshrined into Canton.

TEMPE – Curley Culp, a two-sport standout during his time at Arizona State University and member of the Arizona State Hall of Fame, will be enshrined as part of the 2013 Hall of Fame Class, the Pro Football Hall of Fame Selection Committee announced today.

Culp will join the legends in Canton as part of the seven-member HOF class selected today in New Orleans, La., earning one of the two senior selections that are available in each voting class. The newest members of the Hall of Fame were selected from a list of 17 finalists who had been determined earlier by the Pro Football Hall of Fame’s Selection Committee.

A two-sport star for the Sun Devils from 1965 to 1967, Curley Culp was an All-American defensive lineman in 1967, as selected by Sporting News and Time.

In 1967, he won the NCAA national championship as a heavyweight wrestler – becoming the first Sun Devil to earn an NCAA title in the sport. He was the Gorriarian Award recipient for the most pins at that competition and was later named to the 1968 Olympic squad.

The Yuma, Ariz., native was twice named to the All-Western Athletic Conference team while in Tempe before beginning his professional career with the Kansas City Chiefs of the AFL in 1968. He starred for the Chiefs, appearing in the 1969 AFL All-Star Game and the 1971 Pro Bowl.

He played in 179 games during 14 seasons of professional football, representing the Chiefs from 1968-74. He is the 10th member of the Kansas City Chiefs to be elected to the Hall of Fame and was also inducted to the Chiefs’ Hall of Fame in 2008.

Culp started at defensive tackle on Kansas City’s Super Bowl IV squad, helping the Chiefs earn a 23-7 victory over the Minnesota Vikings and is now the fifth member of that Super Bowl team to be enshrined into Canton.

 
#24
Geoff
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 6:03 PM EDT

Dustin/Chet – did I mention that I briefly met Cael on my PSU trip? That is an impressive new wing he made them build on the old Rec Hall. My buddy has made a point to spend a little time with him whenever he can because the guy is the ultimate in his sport – first as an athlete and now as a coach. My favorite story is that when he got to PSU he declared that Penn State was now the center of the wrestling universe (not Iowa or Nebraska) and then went out and made it happen in 2 years. Classic move to redshirt all of his returning wrestlers (even seniors) to give them one year under his tutelage, then bring in his own guys and win back-to-back national titles in his second and third year. (prior to that PSU had never won a B1G title and hadn’t won a national title in almost 60 years)

He is a bigger man than I thought. With a huge bald melon, enormous paws, and a easy going demeanor. I guess you can be that relaxed when you have absolutely zero fear in any situation.

Another quick story, when I was playing college ball we had a decent wrestling team, led by a former Olympic coach. He was in his 70′s but always worked out with his guys…. Every day. The guy was in better shape at 70 than any player on our basketball team, and I definitely would have been scared to fight him even though I had 50 years and 50 pounds on him. Anyway I was always amazed at how hard the wrestlers went every day. We went really hard in practice – our coach had played college football and brought the mentality to go as hard as we could in practice in an efficient amount of time so that games would seem easier – but our practices couldn’t hold a candle to theirs. They had a gym that was upstairs from our court and had the same afternoon practice time we did, so every day we would see them running the stairs, then down the hall and up the stairs at the other end of our gym and back into their gym… For a half hour at the beginning of their practice and then another half hour at the end…. And counting, in a chanting fashion, as a team the entire time they did it. Those dudes were hard.

 
#25
Chet
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 7:08 PM EDT

I guess that wasn’t him, huh? I’ll try and find out the NFL defender I heard that about. At least I got the wrestler part right.

My mistake.

 
#26
Chet
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 7:09 PM EDT

I think it may have been Otis Sistrunk that didn’t play college ball and went on to the NFL but I don’t remember him being a college wrestler.

Oh well…

 
#27
Chet
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 7:16 PM EDT

I assume all Hoosier fans know this but former IU coach Doug Blubaugh was one of the greatest wrestlers to ever set foot on a mat.

 
#28 Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 7:59 PM EDT

Doug Blubaugh was apparently superhuman. No seriously, there’s lots of evidence to support this. I wrote an obit for him when he died. It was like writing about Bill Brasky. The man was actually hit by a pickup truck riding a scooter and got up and started walking. Died later from internal injuries but he survived the initial blow, which is pretty much incredible. His sons said he could walk the length of football fields on his hands.
Geoff, Sanderson was an incredible character. Obviously, he went to Iowa State so I didn’t know him that well, but I did a story on him freshman year, and he’s a different level of mellow. Never celebrated, even when he won national titles. It went beyond acting like he’d been there before to the point that you had to wonder if he had a pulse.

 
#29
pbat
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 8:16 PM EDT

I just saw that wrestling was pushed out by golf. What a joke. An Olympic god medal will not mean nearly as much to a PGA player than the money that comes with winning any tour event.

 
#30
Chet
Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - 10:34 AM EDT

Well, the golf thing does it for me. Won’t be watching any Olympics anymore. It’s just a showcase for professional athletes with a little extra time on their hands.

Not interested.

 
#31
iuhoosier1992
Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - 11:05 AM EDT

It is all a money grab by the Olympic committee. Golf will be a big ticket draw and TV draw, where wrestling falls short on both of those points. You will have some pretty big names playing, but I don’t see it lasting. Kind of like Olympic tennis. You are starting to see less interest in the pros playing Olympic tennis and will eventually start seeing the stars drop out. Golf will be the same. I see Tiger playing the first year, but not after that.

 
#32
Chet
Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - 11:20 AM EDT

People actually watch golf!!??

I’ll sell them some ringside tickets to get a gander at my lawn growing.

 
#33
Hoosier Clarion
Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - 11:35 AM EDT

Chet, my grandad, a fine old gent, who died 21 years ago this month, in his 90′s would reflect on all the change seen in a long life, would then masterfully proclaim there is a reason people do not live to be 300 years old.

 
#34
Hoosier Clarion
Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - 11:38 AM EDT

How disrespectful of me, (G)randad.

 
#35
Harvard for Hillbillies
Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - 11:49 AM EDT

Geoff-

I was a stay-at-home dad for many years. I grew female parts in the process.

It’s all quite pathetic…I have many original songs that I sung to my child. I actually made up a song about a Fisher Price bassinet we would rock our baby to sleep in.

Sounds like you’re very excited. I know it’s cliche, but it does go by so very fast.

 
#36
Hoosier Clarion
Wednesday, February 13, 2013 - 11:57 AM EDT

Yup, no doubt living life is in the very fast lane.

 


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