Zeller on NBA Draft, 5-Hour Energy and Paul Allen

57 comments by   |   Thursday, June 20, 2013 - 7:40 pm EDT

His pro career hasn’t started yet, and he won’t know his ultimate NBA destination until next Thursday’s draft at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn. But there is one thing Cody Zeller has discovered about life after college.

“It’s nice,” he said by phone Thursday afternoon from Detroit, where the likely lottery pick will work out for the Pistons Friday. “It’s just crazy, because my whole life I haven’t been able to accept a free pair of socks or anything. Now it’s a whole different world. It’s nice doing endorsements and stuff.”

One of those endorsement deals is with the energy drink 5-Hour Energy, for which Zeller recently asked on Twitter, “What’s the craziest thing you’ve ever done? Climbed Mt. Everest, ate a whole package of Oreos, etc. Reply with #5HEnergy.”

One of the responses came from IU soccer product Eriq Zavaleta. “@CodyZeller craziest? We left Indiana before they made us leave #5HEnergy.”

Zeller may need a 5-Hour Energy before the draft. He has been in high demand both on and off the court since finishing his final exams at Indiana University last month. The very next day Zeller flew to Los Angeles, home of his agent, Sam Goldfeder of Excel Sports, to begin working out. And it’s been a whirlwind ever since.

“I was there a few weeks, went to Chicago (for pre-draft camp), back to L.A. and then started workouts,” Zeller said. “I’ve been from L.A. to Salt Lake City to Phoenix to Portland, Oklahoma City, Minneapolis, Sacramento, back to L.A., Philadelphia, Charlotte and in Detroit now. Then I go to Orlando (to work out for the Magic) and then to New York for the draft.”

But he said it’s hard to gauge whether some teams like him more than others.

“All of them are seriously interested,” Zeller said. “It’s a big venture for them, so they do an unbelievable amount of research on your background and get to know you personally.
“It’s tough to tell what will happen on draft night — this year more than most years. It will be interesting to see what happens.”

But the IU All-American is certainly enjoying the process, recently going out to eat with new Charlotte Bobcats assistant coach Patrick Ewing, the former All-Star center of the Knicks.

He also got the chance to reunite with former Indiana teammate Victor Oladipo for a workout in Phoenix.

“It was fun competing against him,” Zeller said. “It brought me back to IU, and it was definitely fun to do that. We’re always comparing stories and doing all that, so it’s good to have someone else go through it with me.”

The highlight, however, might have been Zeller’s ability to put his Kelley School of Business background to good use when Microsoft co-founder and Portland Trailblazers owner Paul Allen flew in on his helicopter to watch him work out two weeks ago.

“Two of my toughest classes (at Kelley) were Microsoft Excel classes,” Zeller said. “It’s amazing all the stuff you can do with it.
“(Allen)’s obviously a computer genius, but he’s not the most personable guy. But I talked to him about Excel for half of the conversation. I didn’t say it just because he was co-founder of Microsoft. We talked about both Excel and Access for 10-15 minutes.
“Then later I went out with some of the coaches, who said, ‘We have to say no other draft prospect has talked Excel with Paul Allen before.’”

There’s no telling what that means, if anything, come next Thursday night. But at least the whirlwind will finally settle down.

“I think the craziest part is not knowing what city I’m going to,” Zeller said. “I have no control over it and no choice. It’s definitely been fun. I’m just trying to enjoy it all.”

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57 comments:
#1
Ben
Thursday, June 20, 2013 - 9:17 PM EDT

I slowly see myself being sucked into the NBA vacuum. While I won’t change my allegiance from the Pacers, I will keep an eye on Oladipo and Zeller. Just what I need. Something else to take my time away.

 
#2
Ben
Thursday, June 20, 2013 - 9:19 PM EDT

Off the topic, but is it worth my money to be a “premium member” at Peegs?

 
#3
Larry
Thursday, June 20, 2013 - 11:01 PM EDT

Ben, it is a decent return, but I think you can find just as good of IU sources for free. I think you would be better served to spend your money on becoming a premium member of RedTube.

 
#4 Friday, June 21, 2013 - 7:51 AM EDT

Ben, save the coin and ask Aruss.

I wonder if the “Allen’s not the most personable guy” comment un-waxes that shiny relationship Cody had with Paul over Excel.

 
#5
Hoosier Clarion
Friday, June 21, 2013 - 8:11 AM EDT

Ben I know what you are saying about getting back into the NBA fold. For the last 4 years I’ve tried to become a fan again of the league that promotes traveling, carrying the ball, moving screens, 3 second violations and fouls, fouls and many more fouls not called than called. This season it came down to this. I just could not force myself to watch game 6 or 7. I really do not want the 2 hand set shot back but for my money the greatest athletes in the world do not have to cheat(and get away with it)to entertain me. Throw the damn rule book out, it is a TV circus.

 
#6
Dennis Gagnon
Friday, June 21, 2013 - 9:04 AM EDT

Peegs is worth it, I have been a member for yrs. I also subscribe to HT during BB season.

 
#7
Ron
Sunday, June 23, 2013 - 10:42 AM EDT

As if the ncaa have no bigger fish to fry, we go from the girl caught washing her car with school water to their new ruling. Coaches can not attend live college games if they are scouting future opponents. All sports. Say a coach wants to watch a neighbor’s kid, or nephew or his kid and they are scheduled to play either team later in the year. No go. Can watch it on TV as many times as he wants and use instant replay, thats OK.

Trying to emulate big government standards?
And was passed by full-membership. Rubber-stamped

 
#8
Chet
Sunday, June 23, 2013 - 4:03 PM EDT

Sounds like our NC Legislature. Every day is bat$hit crazier than the one before. They are currently in the process of charging a $50 surcharge to owners of hybrid vehicles because they don’t use ENOUGH gas and other resources. It is a lock to pass.

 
#9
Mariner Tom
Sunday, June 23, 2013 - 4:17 PM EDT

Chet, that’s pretty outrageous. Once again showing that the “market” is only “free” to the extent that it cooperates with the needs and profitability of big oil.

 
#10
Chet
Sunday, June 23, 2013 - 4:31 PM EDT

As it is with the US House of Representatives, the party that received the most votes is well in the minority due to gerrymandering. There is no hope in sight.

 
#11
Harvard for Hillbillies
Sunday, June 23, 2013 - 5:04 PM EDT

You guys sound so terribly cynical and negative. So I guess “big oil”, the “NC Legislature”, and the NCAA are all part of the Establishment?

Would this be somehow similar to the big business blowhards that colleges hire to run their AD departments to market the sports programs with cheesy promotions and carnival gimmicks like it’s a Kentucky fireworks outlet off highway 65?

Be careful you bunch of fiery Libs..The NSA is likely watching every comment made on every obscure blog. Small liberal college towns like Bloomington are likely observed with much more scrutiny. Barack’s snoopers likely have their ears all over Scoop. I mean, if a bit of photo-doctoring of our sports personalities during their comical rants and escapades is considered off limits by some on here, then I would have to believe the NSA would look at the rebellious tone of your anti-corporation, anti-Legislative bodies…and anti-sports governing agencies for our American institutions with very troubling ears/eyes.

Maybe L*ffy was never banned…? Maybe he’s just somehow quietly vanished. Or, maybe L*ffy is on their side..? Get my drift?

 
#12
Ben
Sunday, June 23, 2013 - 6:52 PM EDT

Tree hungers and environmentalists make me sick. Keystone Pipeline??

 
#13
Ben
Sunday, June 23, 2013 - 6:53 PM EDT

I meant huggers.

 
#14 Sunday, June 23, 2013 - 6:54 PM EDT

Oh no….

 
#15
Hoosier Clarion
Sunday, June 23, 2013 - 6:56 PM EDT

Same theory as subsidizing tobacco farmers, taxing tobacco and funding a cure for cancer. Oxymoron x 3. Gerrymandering has and does go both ways. Until 1994 the current minority party held the U.S. House for over 4 decades. A gored ox is a gored ox.

 
#16
Ben
Sunday, June 23, 2013 - 7:18 PM EDT

Harvard,

I’m sending a fed over to seize your computer.

 
#17
TsaoTsuG
Monday, June 24, 2013 - 1:45 AM EDT

I’m confused, I see lots of warnings to urgently call a doctor if an …[something]… lasts more than four hours.

But then, they are trying to sell me a 5-Hour Energy wonder drink????

No wonder we’re so confused about government regulatory agencies!

 
#18
Chet
Monday, June 24, 2013 - 8:56 AM EDT

HC, in the US House of Representative the minority party received a million more votes than the majority party. There has been some amount of gerrymandering in the past, on both sides of the aisle, but nothing that so ignored the will of the voter as what we currently experience.

In NC, and many other states, they gerrymandered districts to get super majorities in the legislatures while receiving a minority of votes. Then these ‘minority majorities’ gerrymandered the Congressional districts to to put a majority in the House despite having a million vote deficit. Many state legislature are currently toying around with ways to rig Presidential elections as well.

You don’t see anything wrong with that just because it’s your party? Consider this, eventually the overwhelming numbers of voters in the majority are likely to take back these institutions. If they follow the same script as your party it will be virtually impossible for your party to ever regain any sort power. They would have both a minority of voters AND a rigged system.

Voting districts should be set by non partisan groups and determined by population and traditional boundaries such as county lines. Elections should be determined by the majority of voters in their local region (last year Asheville was plucked out of the middle of our county and, for election purposes, plugged into a voting district with much larger, and completely unfamiliar, Gastonia, nearly one hundred miles east of here. The resulting districts went from nearly even populations to a 4:1 disparity. Give me a reasonable explanation for that.). Now elections simply a game of Risk with billionaires rolling the dice.

The state of North Carolina is completely and totally owned and operated by a single vile little man named Art Pope. That’s it, one guy. He hand picked our new governor and most of the legislature and then quadrupled the amount of advertising money that any of their adversaries could come up with. All their opponents had were voters but the district lines had been strategically moved about to nullify the will of the voters.

After four decades of becoming the banking capital of the world (did you know that?) and a leader in technological development we are being turned into Mississippi in a single session of the legislature. Were my own children not already educated we would be forced to move as they have decimated the educational system. We still may have to move because we don’t want to live in the third world country Art Pope is trying so hard to create.

That’s all. Other than being morally offended I doubt much of this will affect me personally. It’s just wrong. Peace out. Great job baseball team. Amazing recruiting job Coach Wilson.

I just returned from a week long motorcycle trip (most of it through Mississippi on the Natchez Trace). Don’t want to live there but it was a nice ride. I’m a history nerd and that’s what that ride is really good for.

I’ve been following a bunch of local kids that got drafted. It’s amazing how quick you become a pro in baseball. A couple weeks ago you’re in school and now you’re playing in a rookie league every night. No off season to prepare. Crazy.

 
#19
Hoosier Clarion
Monday, June 24, 2013 - 9:48 AM EDT

Yes, Chester, I am well versed as to the financial horsepower NC has built. Many consulting trips to Charlotte educated me on that subject rather well. Are you really that surprised all politics is local(don’t recall for sure who said that)(T.P. O’Neill?). Gerrymandering was 1st used 200 some years ago to gain advantage of elections. The 1st party to use it was the Democratic-Republican party, forerunner to the modern day Democrats. Kinda akin to the federal scheme by the Dems FDR to pack the SCOTUS. Sorry about you ox.

 
#20
Chet
Monday, June 24, 2013 - 10:27 AM EDT

“Kinda akin to the federal scheme by the Dems FDR to pack the SCOTUS. Sorry about you ox.”

Which, though proposed, never actually occurred, so we have some apples and oranges mixing in here. FDR was dealing with much the same type of staunch party loyalty at the SCOTUS that the Republicans enjoy today. Fortunately, for the country, the will of the majority of voters was heard and they were able to reverse the damage of previous administrations (which remarkably mirror recent history). Hopefully, one day, the voters will again be able to decide the outcome of elections. I don’t think that should be too much to ask.

I believe it was Tip O’Neill with the quote you referenced.

 
#21
Hoosier Clarion
Monday, June 24, 2013 - 10:38 AM EDT

…and if the gerrymandering maneuver had not been successful in the 1800′s your ox would be healthy today…

 
#22
Ron
Monday, June 24, 2013 - 10:40 AM EDT

Riding in Mississippi – Was heading south to north and at each cross road there was a sign pointing to a public swimming pool. Let to wonder if a) Mississippi has thousands of public pools, or b) do all the signs lead to one pool.

 
#23 Monday, June 24, 2013 - 10:47 AM EDT

I actually find this conversation interesting… I can’t find the context for the “ox” comment. I kow you are a man of few words Clarion, but can you elaborate a tad for me on your last post?

 
#24
Harvard for Hillbillies
Monday, June 24, 2013 - 10:53 AM EDT

Top 10 anagrams for gerrymandering:

10. Marrying gender
9. Ring my gardener
8. My grander reign
7. Randy merge grin
6. My anger grinder
5. Merry dinner gag
4. Merry aging nerd
3. Granny germ ride
2. Ginger ran me dry
1. Darn grim energy

 
#25
Chet
Monday, June 24, 2013 - 11:11 AM EDT

Geoff, it’s an old saying “it all depends on whose ox is being gored.”

It basically means it’s subjective.

Ron, the ‘Trace’ was OK but I was hoping for more of a limited access road like the Blue Ridge Parkway. The Trace has direct access to Interstates, and about half the roads it intersects, so it gets used by commuters.

I can get on the BRP and there’s rarely any traffic because, except for a short section between Hwy 25 and 74A, it’s just not a good way to get anywhere. It’s just a great ride.

The Trace is good for it’s history, Indian mounds and such, but it doesn’t have the buffers other limited access roads have. The countryside is nice but you’ll look out on houses, businesses and cultivated fields. When you see that kind of things off the BRP they are usually miles away from your vista.

We made a point of stopping at “family style” diners along the way. Asheville has amazing restaurants and I eat pretty healthy but I went “full Paula Deen” (minus the racial slurs) for my dining last week.

Oh, this just in, Mississippi is much hotter than the mountains in summer.

 
#26
Chet
Monday, June 24, 2013 - 11:24 AM EDT

Geoff, the Dems actually got 1.4 million more votes than the Republicans for the US House of Representatives and ended up outnumbered 234 to 201 due to redistricting.

The NC House is controlled by Republicans 68-52 and the Senate by Republicans 31-19 even though Democrats got 51% of the House popular vote and 52% of the Senate popular vote.

Let’s hear one of those Tea Baggers tell us about democracy and majority rule just one more time.

 
#27 Monday, June 24, 2013 - 12:14 PM EDT

Thanks Chet.

Clarion/Chet – still trying to figure out exactly what the 1800′s have to do with it… It’s my understanding that the Democratic-Republican Party is ALSO the forerunner to the modern Republican Party…. It split into the Jacksonian Democrats and the Whigs… Whigs became Republicans about 50 years later.

So I don’t think you can blame one party over the other for gerrymandering (if the D-R Party is truly the source of it). Hopefully we can all agree that it is a politically manipulative process that harms the system just as the rampant and extreme gifting of corporate money into the political system does.

Clarion – in my town up here we have a gun shop right on the main drag. (my town is on the main road from Portland, and points south, into the Lake Region and Presidential Mountains, so in the summer it’s jammed). He has a sign out front that he’s always changing. You would get a kick out of it. Best marketing I’ve ever seen. Just continually blasts anything even an inch left of far-right politics. Some are funny… Some outrageous… Some interesting… Some totally informational…

Today he changed it to:

“Like, I totally voted for democrats.
Like, what’s going on?
Like, where’s my free stuff”

I actually took pictures of the sign for a year and made an album for my buddies dad for his birthday a couple years ago because its so entertaining.

 
#28
Chet
Monday, June 24, 2013 - 2:23 PM EDT

Yeah, it’s interesting, the only people that claim that the Dems were offering (or expecting) anything free were the Republicans and yet the only ones offering gifts (tax cuts for billionaires) were the Republicans. Since there base can be reliably expected to believe as they are told to the meme became ‘Democratic voters expect something for free’.

Of course, history (and reality) has shown us that nothing could be farther from the truth.

 
#29
TsaoTsuG
Monday, June 24, 2013 - 5:16 PM EDT

Geez Chet, just read your statement,…pretty good theory,…all I had to do is to change a couple of locations here and there and,… voila America’s great Windy City. Change their names and point out that the evil politics also comes (from- drum roll) the (liberal) Democrats who (in your words)…

“gerrymandered districts to get super majorities in the legislatures while receiving a minority of votes. Then these ‘minority majorities’ gerrymandered the Congressional districts to put a majority in the House (allowing themselves to gerrymander some more and rig elections.”

And, as you say, now … “toying around with ways to rig Presidential elections as well.” Listen, I love and support immigration reform, how could I not? My old man hit these shores with nothing but a dream…

But, let’s be honest, it was not purity of soul that led to bringing in, uhhhh about 11-12 million undocumented immigrants (1986 Immigration Amnesty)would eventually add about 7-8 million new voters to the voting rolls that would, of course, give shift control to the Democratic part of key urban areas and, therefore, key electoral
states. Nor, were the Republicans who supported the policy thinking about ‘give me your poor, your hungry masses…and not about how the influx of millions of new laborers would lower the cost of labor…

As you so elegantly state:

“You don’t see anything wrong with that just because it’s your party? Consider this, eventually the overwhelming numbers of voters in the majority are likely to take back these institutions. If they follow the same script as your party it will be virtually impossible for your party to ever regain any sort power. They would have both a minority of voters AND a rigged system.” You Chet, are an great socio-political observer!

“Voting districts should be set by non partisan groups and determined by population and traditional boundaries such as county lines. Elections should be determined by the majority of voters in their local region (CHANGE HERE TO city supporting your argument] was plucked out of the middle of our county and, for election purposes, plugged into a voting district with much larger, and completely unfamiliar, CAUTION: EDITED-[Cicero, Berwyn, South Chicago, entire communities in southwestern Cook County) west/souuthwest of here and communities even OUTSIDE the state lines routinely bused in to vote in the city's south side 10th. Ward]END OF EDITED CAUTION- The resulting [Chicago] districts went from nearly even populations to a 4:1 (soon closer to 8-1 as the impact of immigration is felt in the voter rolls)disparity.” (Give me a reasonable explanation for that.). Now elections simply a game of Risk with [Democratic politicians] and billionaires rolling the dice. (Don’t fool yourself Chet, John Kerry and others are not exactly dependent on their public office salary to pay for their $4000 Oxxford (yes, double Oxxford suits).

And, just as you continue:

“The state __(fill in)________ is completely and totally owned and operated by a single vile little man named (ohhh, take Illinois, [Mike Madigan who will next elect his daughter as governor (replacing the clumsy Rod Blagojavich(D) who replaced the clumsy George Ryan (R), both now living in federal prisons thanks to their belief in their love of the common man); the Daley clan- and the Pritzker family fortune]; yes Penny, recently named Secretary of Commerce following that great Democratic baker, former Clinton Secretary of Commerce William Daley] and then gave us Our American President Barack ‘hook shot’ Obama who is doing what he can to make sure your health services and supply gig stays afloat. (which, to tell the truth, I am personally deeply grateful for every time I review my Medicare bills. Just being honest and up front.

So…dear Chester, North Carolina and their Republicans, are not all alone ‘fluttering their butterfly wings and changing the climate’ here in Cook county. Nor can I, in all good conscience let you guys there in Charlotte, near my favorite radio station during the 1950-60′s in Galatin, TN ,take credit for are they too original in this thing we lovingly call politics.

Using your words:

“One guy. He hand picked our new governor and most of the legislature and then quadrupled the amount of advertising money that any of their adversaries could come up with. All their opponents had were voters but the district lines had been strategically moved about to nullify the will of the voters.***

“After four decades of becoming (the banking capital) [one of the top commercial/banking centers/trade/transportations centers]of the world (did you know that?) and a leader in technological development we are being turned into Mississippi in a single session of the legislature. Were my own children not already educated we would be forced to move as they have decimated the educational system. We still may have to move because we don’t want to live in the third world country Art Pope (NOTE- substitute Daley, Madigan, …other Democrats/Republicans alike ) are trying so hard to create…”

Chet, just a question- to what extent is your profession a bi-product of the growth and largesse of federal money in health and health services, products and equipment industry? Just asking. Not that it is wrong (although I think providers have way abused the tax payers) into biting away huge chunks of our national/state/municipal and local budgets. When was the last time you look at the copy of the bill provided by Medicare and looked at the outrageous charges for equipment, services and medicines?

One more question, regarding the ‘illuminated selflessness of the Democrats’. Isn’t it amazing how correct “WE” always are?

Personally, having given it a lot of deep thought and examined my heart for purity (I read that somewhere) ;… I’d much prefer seeing the Hoosiers going to the Rose Bowl than saving North Carolina in the name of democracy and justice.

Glad to hear you had a fun motorcycle weekend.

 
#30
Chet
Monday, June 24, 2013 - 5:37 PM EDT

Oh, it was far more than just a fun motorcycle weekend!

 
#31 Monday, June 24, 2013 - 6:32 PM EDT

Wow Chet! Your wife really is fine!

 
#32
Chet
Monday, June 24, 2013 - 9:27 PM EDT

TTG, since you asked, my practice is completely independent of state or federal reimbursement. My services are provided by private pay (which, I’m sure, is commonly turned in to insurance companies as I am a licensed provider to most all of them) or, more often, provided pro bono. I quit billing Medicaid long ago when they were placed under the auspices of fraudulent ‘private’ auditing firms that were paid by the claims they denied. While none of mine have ever been denied I know of scores of excellent therapists that had their claims denied by auditors that couldn’t even understand what they were reading. Many therapists simply quit providing services which, I’m sure, was the plan from the beginning.

As I don’t rely on the money I decided I would rather donate my services than support a ‘private’ criminal enterprise by giving them an opportunity to profit from my services.

Cochlear implants receive little to no federal funding because a) only one of the three manufacturers is in the US and, 2) there is a lot of profit to be made as hearing impairment is the most common birth anomaly (6 in 1000 births). Cochlear implants are like cell phones and computers.

 
#33
Chet
Monday, June 24, 2013 - 9:31 PM EDT

a) and b) (not 2).

 
#34
Ron
Monday, June 24, 2013 - 9:41 PM EDT

Chet. Earlier I wrote about my experiences with Medicare (after M/Care comment by TTG. After reading, I realized if you were not in health care you would have no idea how confusing it is to a provider. So I never submitted it.

Have even more horror stories about HMO’s.

 
#35
TsaoTsuG
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 12:14 AM EDT

Good Chet. Just this weekend I wathed a news item of a little boy (about 4 or 5) who had just received an implant (do not remember exactly what it was) and was having it turned on.The moment at which he hears his dad’s voice for the very first time; the expression on his face literally brought tears to my eyes. Hope it was shown there as well.

Medicare (the insurance program I referred to- I paid 30+ years of premiums into it in during my career) actually has shown to be pretty good but I supplement it through private insurance as well, especially for big ticket items. Medicaid, I’m told, is the program for those whose income is below a defined level, is the federal program and pays for health care for the indigent. To an extent, we all pay for it through our taxes but, truthfully, I have no problem with the share of that program, especially when it comes to kids. Just part of being a great country.

Anyway, as I said, if anything can convince it was the face and gestures of that child who was hearing his father’s voice for the first time. A friend here has a son (about 7) who is deaf and it tears at me when I visit. Hopefully medical technology will help him at some point.

H

 
#36
Chet
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 8:23 AM EDT

One additional comment, every study conducted has shown that provision of a cochlear implant and requisite therapy saves society (insurance companies, Medicaid, school systems, etc.) between $52,000 and $151,000 (depending upon study criteria) per child between the date of diagnosis and their 18th birthday. A child with an implant, once they have been discharged from therapy (for my patients it is generally between age 4 and age 6) requires no other special services.

At that point they’re just another kid (albeit with parents that are extraordinarily well prepared to assist them in school). Their speech is normal (within dialectic norms) and they need no special equipment or services. You encounter these kids every day right now. You just don’t know it.

 
#37
Hoosier Clarion
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 8:30 AM EDT

Chet, How many can you help and by folks like you in a years time? In other words what is the supply and demand?

 
#38
Chet
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 8:51 AM EDT

TTG, we currently have the technology to provide hearing in the frequency ranges of speech to 95% of all hearing impaired individuals. The exceptions are if there is a disruption or absence of the auditory nerve (cranial nerve VIII) or a lesion or other damage in the brain (usually in the olivary nucleus).

If it is the VIII cranial nerve they have other issues such as balance, proprioception, etc. It’s a really bad problem to have.

In some cases I’ve seen kids with no cochlea have an array implanted on nerve bundles where the cochlea should be but never developed in utero. The really good surgeons are really, really talented. This stuff is TINY. I’ve seen some truly amazing adaptations on the fly.

 
#39
Chet
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 9:14 AM EDT

HC, there are around 10,000 children implanted each year. Auditory-Verbal Therapy is recommended for each and every one. There are (last time I checked) about 300 therapists certified in my field. Depending upon the level of commitment of the parents therapy can take from 2 to 4 years (But then, they done. No other services should be needed). So, clearly, there aren’t enough.

Now, I said ‘certified’. There are many, many therapists that use AVT techniques having attended various levels of training. Some, I am sure, are quite good at implementing what they know. But, there’s a lot to know. Mostly they do what they think is right. Unfortunately, much of this stuff is counter intuitive. For example, because of the physical nature of sound, the last thing you want to do if a hearing impaired person can’t understand you is to speak louder. All that does is make the sounds they could already hear louder and drown out the sounds they didn’t understand. But it’s what everyone does.

When I went through the process it required 80 credit hours of direct classroom training (for comparison, a masters is usually 65) and 2,400 hours of therapy mentored by a certified therapist. Since that time they have repeatedly dropped the amount of mentored therapy and it is now down to 900 hours. They had to lower it because the requirement was so demanding that few were willing to go through the process. After that (a a couple other requirements) you sit for the exam, which is about a 5 hour test. It’s given once a year. The day I took it there were 17 candidates from 11 countries.

It might be overkill. I don’t know. But once you get certified you are certainly qualified.

I am often in the roll of a consultant to a school system or university speech and hearing center where I’ll help them get the ball rolling, give a few inservices, and then be available to assist them down the road.

Currently I’m helping set up a pediatric audiology clinic and speech and hearing center in Asheville and another in Johnson City, TN (ETSU). I’ve agreed to mentor their therapists through the process if they are willing to make the commitment.

It’s been great. It’s a wonderful, fulfilling occupation but I’m ready for others to take over.

 
#40
Hoosier Clarion
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 9:34 AM EDT

I had no idea it was such a (for lack of a better suited term) big deal. It is not a fitting for a hearing aid. Relief for you then comes in the set up of as many local clinical centers for your focused purpose?

 
#41
Chet
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 9:57 AM EDT

When a kid gets a CI they start getting a bunch of neurons firing off in their brain. That’s it, just neurons in their brain being stimulated. Many times they don’t even process it as sound as they don’t have any understand of sound.

For example, the first concept I have to teach them is sound vs. no sound. Many times they’ve never heard sound before. Why should they react to it? I’ve seen old school teachers of the deaf stand behind a newly implanted kid, clap a couple pans together, and proclaim the processor wasn’t working because the child didn’t turn around to respond to the sound.

Imagine you were suddenly able to smell a color and someone claims it isn’t working because you can’t identify the color blue by its smell right off. It would be an entirely new sensation for your brain.

A child with some prior hearing, no matter how little, will initially progress much faster than a profoundly deaf child.

 
#42
Chet
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 10:14 AM EDT

I’m not jealous of my role. I wish there was a trained therapist on every street corner. I’m trying to get as many out there as I can.

Technology will change. It may not always be a cochlear implant. For the foreseeable future I think the therapy will follow the same course, though. It follows the normal course of language and auditory skills development (and that’s not gonna change) but at an accelerated pace facilitated by a variety of intervention.

When I first went on faculty at WCU we were one of two universities with classes in the area. Now there are over a dozen. UNC, Michigan, and Johns Hopkins provides an opportunity to begin the certification process during your clinical fellowship year.

It’s a different world than it was 20 years ago. There will always be sign language for a tiny minority but not many parents are gonna choose to go that route when their kid can have an otherwise ‘normal’ life. There aren’t many people to talk to if you can only communicate with sign. Despite the unscientific claim that signing is “the natural language for the deaf” every country has it’s own sign language and there’s nothing ‘natural’ about it.

BTW, hearing aids have changed remarkably during the similar period. Twenty years ago you could get 40dB of gain (amplification)with 10% distortion. (3dB of gain represents one level of magnitude, or double, of sound intensity) Today you can get nearly 70dB of gain with 0.01% distortion.

As I said before, there is plenty of progress because there is a huge market.

 
#43
Hoosier Clarion
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 10:33 AM EDT

Thanks Chet, I now more appreciate your field of endeavor. But I’m still not buying into the 2 wheel transportation adventure. I hold the same reason today for that stance as I did as a rutting buck, I can’t figure out how to make love in the backseat.

 
#44
Harvard for Hillbillies
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 10:45 AM EDT

I bet there’s a deep personal satisfaction in witnessing the kids smiles during those sessions; knowing there is someone that brings the kindness, hope, and tools to engage the world in a way they’ve always dreamed.

It all sounds so clinical, but it’s the hope found in those smiles that I associate with Chet’s choice to make their world happier. The chance to remove some of the unfair stigmas and obstacles for the hearing impaired, the cruel bullying that makes for easy targets someone labeled as “stupid” because they struggle to interpret the sounds…Chet stands in their corner to not only help them enter a world of sound but to offer something most don’t have the love or patience found in a bottom line, profit hungry, get out of my way to riches, society.

There is no greater relief to a broken heart than to find someone that hears with the heart.

 
#45
Chet
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 11:14 AM EDT

Let’s not get carried away.

Historically, though, the hearing impaired were institutionalized for insanity or mental retardation.

Another historical footnote. The rise of the now declining Deaf Culture movement is the result of a measles epidemic in the 1960s that resulted in a big surge in the hearing impaired population. Part of the result was the Deaf Culture movement.

I feel sorry for the Deaf Culture folks. The movement came about to empower a group of people and their commonality centered around American Sign Language (ASL). They fought the implementation of cochlear implants and digital hearing aids as a threat to their culture (and they were right). Now kids (and parents) can choose hearing and spoken language. The Deaf Culture movement is watching the demise of what they worked to achieve. Unfortunately, their expectations are not reasonable.

Television shows are about 15 years behind in their portrayal of the hearing impaired.

 
#46
Harvard for Hillbillies
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 11:40 AM EDT

In response to Clarion’s “backseat” comment…

Is there anything much sexier than watching a beautiful gal hop on a bike, open her stance, thrust her chest against the backside the lucky guy holding all the horsepower in his grip; her willingness to trust and ride at his whim and command every twist and bend, gripping her arms tightly around you while the vibrations of the engine throttling up to the sweet sensations of climbing peaks and backing off a coasting down the valleys, the liberation of the inviting and open roads where love letters fly off the cylinders in foreplay, no need for silly roses or words spoken in poses for spark, just combustion and arms wrapped around your waist, a lover to hold you, trust you, from sunrise ’til dark?

 
#47
Chet
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 12:43 PM EDT

That would get me into a lot of trouble as Ruthie rides her own motorcycles.

However, a slender, 5’11″ babe decked out in full leather astride an all black Triumph Bonneville has its own merits.

 
#48
Harvard for Hillbillies
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 1:43 PM EDT

Not sure if this a Bonneville, but it is going to have to suffice….Harvard & friend.

 
#49
TsaoTsuG
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 2:31 PM EDT

Chet, impressive…really impressive. Again, I hope you are able to find the video moment of the little kid as his implant (I assume) is turned on (I guess, they have to be ‘turned on ‘ at some point following the surgery. It is ‘THE’ moment he hears sound for the first time (his father’s voice). The look in his face, as he part turns…you can literally see his mind trying to figure it out and his hand gesture are probably one of the top three tenderest moments I’ve seen in 72 years …even now, as I try to describe it, eyes get humid. I really hope you can find it, you deserve to see it.

Something about the idea that while many want to ‘save the world’; those that accomplish something, personally and professionally, are those whose goals and accomplishments help one-kid, the next kid (or any other individual) who walks through the door in a real, useful way.

 
#50
TsaoTsuG
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 3:34 PM EDT

Harvard, I don’t understand you sometimes. We are all talking about a very positive thing; commenting about how much good can be done (and one of us does) with everyday professional activities and business endeavors… Folks here very positively nod their heads and voice their wonderment about all the positives of someone’s work and those touched by it and, yes…in a profit making industry that contributes a great deal to ending relieving someone’s pain and challenge….and; here comes Harvard with the same (old tango- Yira, Yira))

“I know everyone’s lying/
I know there’s no such thing as love/
The world cares about nothing/
It just turns away and whirls”
….

“…the world always was, and will be always be/
a cesspool of puke and greed/
that much I know for sure/
in the year nineteen-ten (1910)/
and in 2000 too…”

“no one ever really gives a damn/
and no one ever will/
the planet will just spin and dance
and forever whirl and whirl…”

(“Yira, Yira”…Enrique Santos Discepolo)

 
#51
Harvard for Hillbillies
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 4:28 PM EDT

I don’t know what you’re talking about, Tsao. I believe I offered a very sincere compliment to Chet.

But simply because you say all the right things on a sports blog visited regularly by a smaller bunch of stranded lonely souls than the Gilligan’s Island cast of castaways, doesn’t officially make your shining words, nor your claims of relationships here fostered from the absence of true face-to-face interaction/identities, anymore sincere than the dialogue of an old script in a washed up sitcom.

I think Chet has a great mind and appears to be a very kind person. But until one takes real risks involved in true relationships that move beyond the curtains of cyberspace and internet exchanges, its all pretty much empty jargon while showing off your ability to paint by numbers with a gloating flashlight in a pitch dark cell.

 
#52 Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 7:27 PM EDT

So next time I offer to buy you lunch Harvey Banners why don’t you say “Yes!”

 
#53
Harvard for Hillbillies
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 8:19 PM EDT

I’ve never been the same since the day I was stood up at a 6th grade dance….A girl that I completely adored at my hillbilly middle school said she would be there and then she never showed. She left me with no explanation. I watched her become the most popular girl through four years of high school. I watched her cling to the star athlete and valedictorian of my small hometown..I watched her glow and grow in beauty and popularity while I held my head low next to my hallway locker. I watched myself wonder for years, for decades, what he had that I did not. I watched the thoughts become shovel upon shovel of heavy clay upon the deep hole in my heart. Harvard shall never stack up. I can’t live with the fear of that hallway again.

 
#54 Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 9:13 PM EDT

I’ve got the answer to your question Harvard… He doesn’t sit around for hours, days, months, much less years, wondering about and internalizing meaningless 6th grade occurences. He moves on and lives his life.

Jesus dude… You honestly remember getting stood up at a 6th grade dance? Or is that just a silly story to try to make a point?

It’s just a burger and a couple drafts buddy. Even if I did stand you up, why would you care beyond minor annoyance? Besides it would just give you plenty of pity ammunition to come back to the Scoop with!

 
#55
Chet
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 9:18 PM EDT

Harvard, that MAY actually be a 60s era Triumph. I’m not sure.

TTG, one of the things that I am proudest of is the fact that several of the parents I worked with went back to college to become speech pathologists or special ed teachers.

Harvard, let it go. You never know. Being stood up may have been the luckiest thing that ever happened to you. The person who ended up with that girl may go through a living Hell every day of his life.

Live the life you have the best way you can. Everybody was insecure when they were a kid. Time to move on.

 
#56
Harvard for Hillbillies
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 - 10:34 PM EDT

We’ll see, Geoff. Don’t mean to be such a pain in the ass…

The story is completely true. I lived in the country and me and a buddy would chat it up everyday on rides at the back of the bus with this girl and her best friend. I think her parents were quite religious. My folks rarely took us to church but yet were quite prominent in the town. We were thought of as rich, but it was all in appearances rather than reality. My parents were extremely hard working and innovative..They loved to own nice things and always wanted to show us off.

Chet- I would love to own a bike like that one in the photo. I would have to learn how to ride, of course. You always find the silver lining. Thanks.

 
#57
Chet
Wednesday, June 26, 2013 - 7:57 AM EDT

I can barely remember where I went to school in the sixth grade.

 


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